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How to Prepare a Small Home for a Pet Dog

Bringing a dog home is a big step. First, there is the need for housebreaking and teaching him the rules for proper behavior. You also have to make sure that you are not bringing home a dog that is eventually going to be just too big for the space that you have. The smaller your home, the bigger your challenges are going to be, from choosing the right furniture and where to place it to the additional challenges of finding space for your dog as well.

Know Your Breeds and Their Needs

A small house is no place for a Great Dane even if you plan to keep him outside most of the time. At some point, you will bring the dog inside, and you will realize the error of your choices. Small dogs do well in small houses, but even they need their own space such as a place for a crate or a dog bed plus space for their water and food bowls.

According to one source, “Once a budget is set (and you’ve pinkie promised you’ll stick to it), it’s time to walk your house and evaluate your space. Measure each room you want to decorate and keep those numbers handy while you shop for furniture—the last thing you want is to find a piece you love, only to get it home and realize it’s way too big.” Evaluate your space and prepare for decoration and furniture placement that will be appealing to the eye, functional for the people living there and mindful of the dog’s needs as well.

Multi-use Furniture: Form Meets Function in One Piece

Using smaller pieces is obvious, but there are other things that you can do as well. A floor lamp is only a floor lamp while a cute lamp on a small table gives you a place to put items plus light where you need it. If you are really short on floor space or the new dog is super active, use a wall mounted lamp instead making sure that the cords are safely tucked away.

A little ottoman with a cut out is great because it can be used for your feet, additional seating around a low table as well as for a hiding/sleeping space for the dog if he feels overwhelmed or just needs a quick nap.

Every item that you place should have a real function. Leave enough room around everything so that you have a path in and out of the room or to the furniture. Some dogs will just naturally find their own path around every obstacle while others might work on moving the furniture that they think is in the way. If you notice that happening with certain items, pay attention and see if the dog has an eye for decorating flow and accept his suggestions.